Why run Windows software on Linux?

Discuss running non-Linux applications and plugins on Linux, for example via wine

Moderators: khz, MattKingUSA

jonetsu
Established Member
Posts: 1426
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:05 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby jonetsu » Sat Dec 29, 2018 10:45 pm

Michael Willis wrote: Ha! I was just going to ask if you were growing the wood yourself! As we're already way of topic anyway, I'll mention that my dad just helped me build a workbench in my garage; now I'm really considering what kind of musical instruments I can create (or even invent) in there...


You do know that Lee Valley sells a full line of tools for making guitars (and other instruments) :
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,250&p=76068
Last edited by jonetsu on Sat Dec 29, 2018 10:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jonetsu
Established Member
Posts: 1426
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:05 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby jonetsu » Sat Dec 29, 2018 10:56 pm

Loki Harfagr wrote: Now, if you come to drink some kvass I'm confident there's no serious need to go invent a language since it's included in the brew ;-)


I actually made kvass quite a few times. It's very, very good. And very easy to make if there's a source of excellent unsliced wholesome dark rye bread around. I used to get it at an East European supermarket, a Lithuanian bread.

The thing is with kvass is that after the bread has soaked it's removed from the liquid while the liquid will ferment in the next few days. That soaked bread - not really dripping but only soaked - makes the basis for an excellent pudding. Add some raisins and cook in oven for some time.

One could say that imported high quality wholesome dark rye bread can be expensive but every bit of it is used.

Kvass is low in alcohol content. Juts a nice touch which goes really well with the produced carbonated water.

OTOH, if there's an East European bakery around, and moreover a Russian one, they can be making kvass with the leftover dough they have. Although commercial kvass is not as good as homemade.

tramp
Established Member
Posts: 1401
Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:13 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby tramp » Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:39 am

jonetsu wrote:And I've also decided to become One-with-the-Universe so in order to achieve that I have dropped all guitar playing on guitars that are not made by me. This is cheating. So now I have to build my very first guitar before I ever play again. I will start fresh for this Honest-to-Life path by taking a trip to the public library. My estimates are that around 7 years from now I should be able to play one note on a guitar that I've totally built.

... depending on how soon I finish building the car so I can go and get some nice wood.


I've build a couple of instruments once, like a Thorn violin, a kokulele (which is a ukulele with a coconut body), a Kalimba, some flutes, a harp (a little one with 24 strings), and, of course, I've build a banjo!

To build my kokulele I need to make a journey to Thailand and do island hopping in order to find the one with the Dimensions suite my calculations.
Calculations & planning takes 3 month before, collect the needed materials another 3 month, building it, takes 1 week. This is the instrument I play most, still after 30 years were I've build it.
That said, it is indeed a pleasure to build your own instruments.
On the road again.

j_e_f_f_g
Established Member
Posts: 1045
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:48 pm

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby j_e_f_f_g » Sun Dec 30, 2018 5:19 am

tramp wrote:I've build a banjo!


That's something that should be confessed only at an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting.

User avatar
AlexTheBassist
Established Member
Posts: 279
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 3:44 am
Location: Russia, Moscow

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby AlexTheBassist » Sun Dec 30, 2018 7:52 am

tavasti wrote:Elitistic attitude. For example my case. Busy with work and family, started learning from zero. Picked up guitar first time of my life when I was 44 years old. Can't play, don't know music theory, don't know software, don't know terms. Trying to learn everything from composing, playing instrument, recording, mixing, mastering, etc. And now you say that sure presets for guitarix are bad thing. It is same like sayig 'it is bad thing to use pre-made instruments, you should craft your instruments yourself'.

Why “elitistic”? I don't know a single engineer using presets, so I assume a human being involved in all that sound engineering thing knows what to do. It's not that hard to go to Amazon and spend $20 on a book about all the knobs and faders.

And yes, for me Guitarix presets are bad, because they are made not for my bass or guitars, I always make my own sounds that work well with my instruments and don't blow up my monitors when switched to. It's not that hard either: all I need to know is some basics about electric instrument processing. The rest is done by ear and taste, no rocket science involved.

Making a preset is like tuning your amp to your needs, it's not like making an instrument from scratch. Every musician knows a set of his own “presets” that work to get the sound they want. That's easy too; so, what's elitist about it at all?

As of crafting my own instruments, that's a great idea. I want to make my own 22EDO bass and guitar.
Kde Neon
Warwick RockBass Streamer Standard
Tons of other borrowed instruments
Presonus Eris E4.5
Some musical education
Ardour, EQ10Q, LSP Plugins…

glowrak guy
Established Member
Posts: 1337
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2014 8:37 pm

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby glowrak guy » Sun Dec 30, 2018 10:30 am

Michael Willis wrote:
glowrak guy wrote:That reminds me, I forgot to add the rosewood, koa, and spruce trees to my orchard :shock:

Ha! I was just going to ask if you were growing the wood yourself! As we're already way of topic anyway, I'll mention that my dad just helped me build a workbench in my garage; now I'm really considering what kind of musical instruments I can create (or even invent) in there...

If you search youtube for

joss stone world tour

there are around 90 videos where Joss has learned a song
from a local artist, and they do a duet, with some really
unique instruments and presentations, since each 'tour stop'
is in a different part of the world. Might see a few instruments
you want to try building. Nice you've got a dad who is in action.
Cheers

User avatar
raboof
Established Member
Posts: 1632
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Deventer, NL
Contact:

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby raboof » Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:15 pm

glowrak guy wrote:
jonetsu wrote:At least for now I can make my own kvass (1) so I have something to drink during all those exciting coming years.

That reminds me, I forgot to add the rosewood, koa, and spruce trees to my orchard :shock:

Would you like some toast?

User avatar
raboof
Established Member
Posts: 1632
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Deventer, NL
Contact:

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby raboof » Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:23 pm

AlexTheBassist wrote:
tavasti wrote:
AlexTheBassist wrote:Wait… Presets? Are you serious? I know virtually no engineers who use them, even with synths. Skill is far more important than “training wheels” for wannabe producers.

Elitistic attitude. For example my case. Busy with work and family, started learning from zero. Picked up guitar first time of my life when I was 44 years old. Can't play, don't know music theory, don't know software, don't know terms. Trying to learn everything from composing, playing instrument, recording, mixing, mastering, etc. And now you say that sure presets for guitarix are bad thing. It is same like sayig 'it is bad thing to use pre-made instruments, you should craft your instruments yourself'.

Why “elitistic”? I don't know a single engineer using presets. Making a preset is like tuning your amp to your needs, it's not like making an instrument from scratch. Every musician knows a set of his own “presets” that work to get the sound they want. That's easy too; so, what's elitist about it at all?

Even if it's easy, there are (easily) more easy things in the world than anyone would have time to learn.

Everyone needs to start somewhere, and I think presets have a role to play there. I'm not sure about "elitistic", but exclaiming "Presets? Are you serious?" at their mention does not help anyone either. Let's support each other on our journeys, rather than scolding each other for not having "made it there" yet.

jonetsu
Established Member
Posts: 1426
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:05 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby jonetsu » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:30 pm

AlexTheBassist wrote:Why “elitistic”? I don't know a single engineer using presets, so I assume a human being involved in all that sound engineering thing knows what to do. It's not that hard to go to Amazon and spend $20 on a book about all the knobs and faders.


That's nevertheless pretty broad. For instance where would be the book on Impulse Modeling Synthesis as used in Tone2's Ray Blaster ? And there's much more than 'knobs and faders' behind Harmor implementation of additive synthesis.

AlexTheBassist wrote:And yes, for me Guitarix presets are bad, because they are made not for my bass or guitars, I always make my own sounds that work well with my instruments and don't blow up my monitors when switched to. It's not that hard either: all I need to know is some basics about electric instrument processing. The rest is done by ear and taste, no rocket science involved.


Anything that's plugged into a Marshall, so to speak, yes. Synths however are something quite different. One can spend quite some time shooting the breeze by just turning knobs to taste w/o any underlying understanding. Especially if one is a musician and not a sound designer and spends time mostly creating music and adapting existing sounds to fit and express within a context.

Some sound designers out there are creating incredible sound sets. They spend a lot of time doing so which for a musician is a lot of time spent not creating music and moreover, a lot of time to perhaps not get the best synth expression that would suit a piece because of various limitations in knowing a synth.

AlexTheBassist wrote:As of crafting my own instruments, that's a great idea. I want to make my own 22EDO bass and guitar.


Electric guitars and basses do not seem to be that difficult to do, basically. There are details such as the neck and frets, although it could be a very good approach to start making one's own, provided the set of tools is there. A few guys did it and shared their videos on youtube.

Cheers.

User avatar
Michael Willis
Established Member
Posts: 819
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:27 pm
Location: Rocky Mountains, North America
Contact:

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby Michael Willis » Sun Dec 30, 2018 5:04 pm

raboof wrote:Let's support each other on our journeys, rather than scolding each other for not having "made it there" yet.

Hear hear... Let's be honest, there are a LOT of things to learn. Some are easy, some are hard. What's easy for me might be hard for somebody else, what's easy for that person might be hard for me.

I'm trying to learn ukelele, improve playing two hands on piano, refine my clarinet technique, arrange harmony, sing vocals, compose music for multiple live instruments while understanding their nuances, learn about recording with different types of mics and room conditions, and I kind of want to try making my own bar chimes for fun.

Eventually I would like to learn more about the digital side of things, including dialing in custom effects, but I'm working on other things right now, so I tend to use presets if they sound decent. I tend to think of myself as a musician first, and sound engineering is only secondary. I understand that sound engineering is important, but I can't learn everything at once.

Anyway, we're way of topic, but I'll bring it back in by saying that some people have windows-native software that accommodates their current workflow, and they're using it to actually make music. Isn't that the express goal here? I don't find a need to run audio software in wine, but I'm not going to criticise anybody else for their technology choices.

glowrak guy
Established Member
Posts: 1337
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2014 8:37 pm

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby glowrak guy » Sun Dec 30, 2018 11:47 pm

https://www.quikquak.com/downloads.html

There is a cool modeled bar chime rack here,
works wrapped by linvst in linux or using wine reaper.
The chimes hang, and are velocity sensitive,
and if you hit two or three adjacent ones they glissand off
in both directions

Not perfect, as it may take awhile for the gui to appear,
a dummy wine error may appear if you've one too many
unrelated dll over-rides, and the gui may be truncated on some displays.
But it's till fun, and musical.

There are five octaves, all the notes are on the white keys
Cheers

User avatar
Michael Willis
Established Member
Posts: 819
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:27 pm
Location: Rocky Mountains, North America
Contact:

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby Michael Willis » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:06 am

glowrak guy wrote:https://www.quikquak.com/downloads.html

Wow, that's amazing... Bonus points for being totally on-topic while responding to my tangential ranting and raving :)

ubuntuuser
Established Member
Posts: 230
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2017 9:46 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby ubuntuuser » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:12 am

jonetsu wrote:
Jack Winter wrote: You need to use the unhide option when mounting the NI .ISO files as otherwise Linux/Wine won't see all the files it needs to install, something like "mount -t udf file.iso -o unhide /mnt". In addition Native Access and some of the plugins probably need a recent wine-staging and vcrun2015 overrides installed with winetricks.


I use wine-staging and linvst, which works pretty good and are simple to use. I compiled linvst and installed wine-staging earlier this year. I also have used winetricks for just one thing: fonts. Sinc ethen I haven't kept an eye on these. What would be the best places to check for updates and development ? I seem to recall that the linvst github or repository doe snot carry much information regarding developments and fixes. I might be wrong though.

Cheers.


LinVst is up to version 2.41 at the moment and has a few Bitwig fixes in the latest release.

I should keep a changelog and will be from now on.

A lot of the LinVst changes over the last year were to support Waves in a solid sort of way.

ubuntuuser
Established Member
Posts: 230
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2017 9:46 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby ubuntuuser » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:16 am

I use wine-staging and linvst, which works pretty good and are simple to use. I compiled linvst and installed wine-staging earlier this year. I also have used winetricks for just one thing: fonts. Sinc ethen I haven't kept an eye on these. What would be the best places to check for updates and development ? I seem to recall that the linvst github or repository doe snot carry much information regarding developments and fixes. I might be wrong though.

Cheers.


LinVst is up to version 2.41 at the moment and has a few Bitwig fixes in the latest release.

I should keep a changelog and will be from now on.

A lot of the LinVst changes over the last year were to support Waves in a solid sort of way and submitting corresponding changes to the Wine code to support Kontakt and Waves Central.

jonetsu
Established Member
Posts: 1426
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:05 am

Re: Why run Windows software on Linux?

Postby jonetsu » Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:13 pm

ubuntuuser wrote: LinVst is up to version 2.41 at the moment and has a few Bitwig fixes in the latest release. I should keep a changelog and will be from now on. A lot of the LinVst changes over the last year were to support Waves in a solid sort of way and submitting corresponding changes to the Wine code to support Kontakt and Waves Central.


Are you part of the linvst development ? Just asking. It's such a corner stone for musical production that it would be nice to know that there's a direct contact here.

Cheers.


Return to “Running non-linux software”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests