High-end pro-audio plug-ins for Linux

Subforum for advertisements. Anything that might be interesting to the LinuxMusicians community is fair game here: hardware or software, Free or proprietary, go wild!

Moderators: MattKingUSA, khz

Post Reply
User avatar
mike@overtonedsp
Established Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:26 pm
Location: Oxford, England
Contact:

High-end pro-audio plug-ins for Linux

Post by mike@overtonedsp »

Applied Computer Music Technologies (developers of the OverTone DSP range of plug-ins) have some high-end plug-ins specifically designed for Linux users at:

https://www.acmt.co.uk

Image

V2.0 updates are now released - these plug-ins further refine processing developed in the OverTone range, together with redesigned user-interfaces which combine familiar intuitive control layouts with a clean, uncluttered modern design. Demo versions are free to download, available as VST2 for Linux.

User avatar
mike@overtonedsp
Established Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:26 pm
Location: Oxford, England
Contact:

Re: High-end pro-audio plug-ins for Linux

Post by mike@overtonedsp »

A little bit more info about these over at ardour.org

nilshi
Established Member
Posts: 321
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:05 pm
Contact:

Re: High-end pro-audio plug-ins for Linux

Post by nilshi »

What makes them "higher", compared to plugins that aim to do the same?

User avatar
mike@overtonedsp
Established Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:26 pm
Location: Oxford, England
Contact:

Re: High-end pro-audio plug-ins for Linux

Post by mike@overtonedsp »

What makes them "higher", compared to plugins that aim to do the same?...
I think the best way to explain it is (as I mentioned in the post at ardour.org) that I’ve been wanting to see what could be done with several modifications to the original OverTone plug-ins, developed over the years, but without wanting to change the character of the originals, which many users value - so this is an opportunity to try that out, together with a refreshed UI scheme - and Linux seemed like the best platform to use.

In terms of audio processing, the approach has always been to try and build the best analogue experience - but in the digital domain (and without the drawbacks of analogue processing). My background in professional audio covers 30 years, so I started before access to high performance DSP was a thing, and the process / engineering was very much analogue. Its also about providing a 'turn key' solution (which on Linux does have its challenges...) but I wanted to build a product that was easy to install, easy to get working, and easy to use - these are designed as tools to get a job done.

That said, I think its also important that the tools you use for mixing / recording don't get in the way either - it shouldn't be possible to make it sound bad - and a lot of work goes into 'tuning' the plug-ins to try to achieve that, for example EQ filter behaviour, control law, ranges, interaction etc.

Free demos are provided, so of course you can try them against any other plug-ins and see if they work well for what you need - that's the most important part.

Post Reply