Some basics for recording with a mixer?

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SuperPenguin
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Some basics for recording with a mixer?

Post by SuperPenguin »

I got a dinky Behringer 10 channel mixer and at the moment, it's getting used for mic'ing my guitar amp and DI for vocals. When I record anything, I set the active mixer channel (including the master channel) sliders right to the 0db point for volume, set all inactive channels to no volume. Not sure if this is a wise approach, but I have noticed it keeps me from clipping so I'm assuming it's a safe way to approach lol.

Now the thing I'm curious about is the EQ on a mixer; my mixer has 3 knobs for eq (high, mid, bass) per channel. It's not much to work with, but I'm wondering if you guys have a simple rule when it comes to micing and just general mixer eq settings. For example, place a higher priority on over certain frequency ranges to maintain clarity during recording guitar or vocals.. things to prevent muddiness on the low end and to prevent tin canny sounds on the high.

Not trying to be too vague here, hope you get what I'm saying...
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MattKingUSA
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Re: Some basics for recording with a mixer?

Post by MattKingUSA »

I usually run a streight channel for everything. But it's really just what ever you think sounds the best. I think it helps to listen to a mix that you like from a band that you like and try to re-create that same mix on your own equipment for vocals or whatever. And then it just helps you get an idea of how to mix some of the sounds that you hear. But you can always digitaly mix as well.
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Re: Some basics for recording with a mixer?

Post by SuperPenguin »

MattKingUSA wrote:I usually run a streight channel for everything. But it's really just what ever you think sounds the best. I think it helps to listen to a mix that you like from a band that you like and try to re-create that same mix on your own equipment for vocals or whatever. And then it just helps you get an idea of how to mix some of the sounds that you hear. But you can always digitaly mix as well.
I hear what you're saying. My approach has been to try to place a higher emphasis on clarity (mostly on mid and high) through the analog mixer first, and then apply the low end via a digital mixer. Once the track sounds the way I like it, I pan it left, make a copy of it, then pan it right on a new channel. Then go back in and eq those 2 channels to get a good feel. I wonder if I'm over-complicating this though...
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Re: Some basics for recording with a mixer?

Post by MattKingUSA »

It sounds to me like your doing some cool stuff with your audio. I like the vocals to be more crisp so I usually put the high end range up just a few notches when recording. But it really just depends on how you want your song to sound in the end. You should do a thrid copy of the vocal with a high pitch shift and reverb. That would be freakin' wicked.
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Re: Some basics for recording with a mixer?

Post by schivmeister »

Ahh..good ol' mixers.

1) Master Fader at 0dB

You should never touch this one.

2) Trim/Gain Pot

This comes before the channel fader, and will determine the amount of raw signal going in. Should start out with a humble amount. A general equation to follow is inverse proportion to the fader.

Important thing to note is that there should be no signal at all if it's all the way off. If you get anything, switch on the pad.

3) Channel Strip Faders

Never start at 0dB. These should be left at infinity and brought up until desired level is achieved. If at 0dB the level is still not loud enough, bring in some gain (2).

====

You'll probably want to monitor, have an outboard reverb, compressor. As such, you should have cables going in to your computer, and then coming back. Compressors are inserts, while reverbs are (AUX) sends/returns.

The EQs available on average mixers are more for monitoring live events (sculpting for the audience to hear) than anything else, hence the limited options. If no computer is available, try and get access to an outboard EQ rack. If not, the mixer EQ will only allow you to fine-tune the basic tonal characteristics. Even when we do live recording, we should take it back and put the tracks through a good deal of DAW mixing :mrgreen:
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