DoReMiFa Solfege

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fretski
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DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:44 am

i guess this is theory

I'm cooking up a guitar fretboard tutorial (because trying to teach is the best way to learn) AND I may be on to something. When I was a child (sometime in primary) they gave us some Do-Re-Mi lessons and THAT scale printed into my brain and is still there more or less in usable condition. But I don't really remember what it was supposed to be i.e. is it like a relative floating scale, is that what they call solfege? I guess it applies to a major scale, I don't see how what I learned could go with a minor mood.

Lyberta
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Lyberta » Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:47 am

Funny thing. In Russian there is only "Do Re Mi" note names which makes it very confusing. I find C D E much simpler. Good thing I've learned only English music theory.

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:53 am

That's my point, if I'm right you too missed the point completely, DoReMi is a flying scale that can overlay any abcd, makes everything MUCH easier. I don't really know this, trying to find out. Any gurus out there?

MGdesigner
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby MGdesigner » Mon Oct 24, 2016 7:17 pm

About Solfege, DoReMi system includes fixed do system (= C D E system) and movable do system. In movable do system ,talking about minor scales, they are divided to Do-started minor(Do Re Me Fa Sol La Te) or La-started minor (La Si Do Re Mi Fa Sol La).

I prefer use "CDEFG..." in chord progression, and think scale in movable Do major with Do-started minor system. It make me think pitch interval very quick. In the same chord, many scales come to my mind so easily that I can write my song or improvise fast.

For Example:
1. On a C Chord , I can play C major scale, C Lydian, C Mixolydian,C blues scales (with blues Eb bending to E ),etc....

2. About Chord progression, I think it in CDE system, so It's easy for my to design a progression like this: "Cm7 F7 Bbmaj7 Bm7b5 E7b9 Am7 Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 " .

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Mon Oct 24, 2016 8:11 pm

THANKS, part of what you say is what I'm interested in because I can DOodle the flying Do major scale (if that's what it's going to be called). I'm even thinking of learning to do it in terms of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 which would seem even more useful if I can teach myself. Your use of a chord to guide scales is something I never heard of (or thought of because it's over my head at this point) but it is interesting too.

Lyberta
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Lyberta » Tue Oct 25, 2016 7:28 am

I usually think in numbers, 1 is tonic, 2 is supertonic etc. People usually use roman numerals for that.

MGdesigner
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby MGdesigner » Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:22 pm

fretski wrote: Your use of a chord to guide scales is something I never heard of (or thought of because it's over my head at this point) but it is interesting too.

It's "Chord Tone". You have notes of a chord. Then you add some passing note to form a scale.

rghvdberg
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby rghvdberg » Tue Oct 25, 2016 9:54 pm

A scale is a chord filled up with notes
A chord is a scale with some notes removed

That's the jazz way of thinking about scales/chords

Kuroi
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Kuroi » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:07 pm

I don't know if I missed something but DoReMiFaSolLaSi is exactly the same as ABCDEFG, starting from C. In Spanish we use indistinctly both. Cm7 is "Do minor 7" and so on.

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:22 pm

I just meant that DoReMi is ringing in my ear since childhood, abc never did. But this is a prehistoric thread, I've learned a lot about chords and scales since.

Lyberta
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Lyberta » Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:22 am

It's been just 4 months...

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:57 am

in politics 4 days is an eternity, when you're studying music four months is nine lives ..more dignified too :roll:

Lyberta
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Lyberta » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:43 pm

It's been 9 years since I started music theory and I still feel like not a lot of time has passed.

jonetsu
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby jonetsu » Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:08 pm

Maybe one day I will learn about lydian, mixolydian and all these modes as well as chord progressions. I must say that as time goes by chances are much less likely :)

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hucasys
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby hucasys » Wed Jun 28, 2017 6:21 pm

Do = C
Re = D
Mi = E
Fa = F
Sol = G
La = A
Si = B

Comes from:

Ut queant laxis
resonare fibris
Mira gestorum
famuli tuorum,
Solve polluti
labii reatum,
Sancte Iohannes.

Ut queant laxis or Hymnus in Ioannem is a Latin hymn in honour of John the Baptist written in Horatian Sapphics[1] and traditionally attributed to Paulus Diaconus, the eighth-century Lombard historian. It is famous for its part in the history of musical notation, in particular solmization. The hymn is sung to a Gregorian chant, the original do-re-mi music.
The chant is useful for teaching singing because of the way it uses successive notes of the scale: the first six musical phrases of each stanza begin on a successively higher notes of the hexachord, giving ut–re–mi–fa–so–la; though ut is replaced by do in modern solfège. The naming of the notes of the hexachord by the first syllable of each hemistich (half line of verse) of the first verse is usually attributed to Guido of Arezzo. Guido, who was active in the eleventh century, is regarded as the father of modern musical notation. He made use of clefs (C & F clefs) and invented the ut-re-mi-fa-sol-la-si notation. The hymn does not help with the seventh tone as the last line, Sancte Iohannes, breaks the ascending pattern. The syllable si, for the seventh tone, was added in the 18th century.
It is not known who wrote the melody. Guido possibly composed it,[2] but he more likely used an existing melody. A variant of the melody appears in an eleventh-century musical setting of Horace's poem Ode to Phyllis (4.11) recorded in a manuscript in France.[3] The hymn uses classical metres: the Sapphic stanza consisting of three Sapphic hendecasyllables followed by an adonius (a type of dimeter).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ut_queant_laxis


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