DoReMiFa Solfege

Ask general music theory or songwriting questions, get feedback!

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trulan
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby trulan » Thu Jul 06, 2017 10:31 am

fretski wrote:THANKS, part of what you say is what I'm interested in because I can DOodle the flying Do major scale (if that's what it's going to be called). I'm even thinking of learning to do it in terms of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 which would seem even more useful if I can teach myself. Your use of a chord to guide scales is something I never heard of (or thought of because it's over my head at this point) but it is interesting too.

I find solfege (the "flying Do scale") to be very useful for singing, not so much for playing guitar or other instruments. That's probably because of how I learned music as a child. I went to a Mennonite school for the first four years, and all music was vocal only (a capella). All our song books were printed with shaped notes. (the Aiken system - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shape_note)

The benefit of this system is that it forces you to think of everything in intervals. This is especially useful if you are sight-reading music, particularly when multiple vocal harmonies are involved. When singing a note, unless you are gifted with perfect pitch (pitch recognition), there is nothing absolute to relate a note's letter name (C, F, G, etc.) to the sound produced - you need to mentally calculate the relationship your assigned letter note has to the other notes being sung, figure out what it should sound like, then sing it. With shaped notes, all that work is done for you, so sight reading a capella music becomes much easier. It is directly obvious how the note I am singing relates to the key I am in, as well as how it relates to the other notes being sung.

For playing any musical instrument, the benefits quickly disappear, as the way to produce each note is defined by its letter name. To play a C on a piano, you hit the "C" key.

The 'numbering' system is useful for naming chords, particularly if you are playing in a band with instruments tuned to various keys, or a country/bluegrass band where capos might be at different places on some of the instruments. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_number_system

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:47 pm

> I find solfege (the "flying Do scale") to be very useful for singing,
> not so much for playing guitar or other instruments. That's probably
> because of how I learned music as a child. I went to a Mennonite
> school for the first four years, and all music was vocal only (a capella).
> All our song books were printed with shaped notes. (the Aiken system
> - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shape_note)

Thanks trulan!

I knew less about capella but have since been very pleasantly surprised seeing that almost all who sing using that system tend to sing 'very nicely'. Far from being able to put a finger on it I will on opportunity examine the method further. If a guitar worked like a fretless violin, especially with only one string, it might be easier to adapt :-)


Edit:
I misread your post, it isn't capella that forces you to think in terms of intervals but shaped-notes. I find that very worthwhile even as just a greenhorn.

fretski
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby fretski » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:36 pm

rghvdberg wrote:A scale is a chord filled up with notes
A chord is a scale with some notes removed


Sorry for bouncing back a little late but I find the above interesting. Could you expand on it a little more?

A chord being a scale with some notes removed is something I understand only to the extent that for example the 3 notes making it up must by definition be part of the scale in point.

Dominique
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Re: DoReMiFa Solfege

Postby Dominique » Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:16 pm

rghvdberg wrote:A scale is a chord filled up with notes
A chord is a scale with some notes removed

That's the jazz way of thinking about scales/chords


If you play 3 notes, the fundamental, the tierce and the quinte, you know if you are playing in major, minor, augmented or diminished, which also implies than these 3 notes will always sound good. So just play chords and scales using these 3 notes and use your feeling to play the other notes. That's the popular music way of thinking about chords and scales.


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