Back... in the days

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studio32
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Back... in the days

Post by studio32 »

Hi,

I'm back checking out Linuxaudio after some years. Was quite active to get this forum board started when Nathan launched it and it's a pleasure to see that's still active! My plan is to learn SuperCollider, but it's hard to resist looking at how Linuxaudio has evolved.

If you think about those days, much has improved. Back then it would almost be unthinkable that software as Bitwig Studio would be available on Linux. Ardour with midi was just a dream for builders of sandcastles. Nice to see it seems to go so well with the donation system. Nice to read the 20th anniversary blog post of Paul Davis. LV2 really struggled to get it's engines started, now there seems to be a lot of LV2 plugins available.

My fascination was always with the modular approach of Linux though. One task one tool, Keep It Simple Stupid and I still find that approach the most interesting. In reality, it often turned out to a nightmare, cause you need small tools which are very good in what they aim for and then all those tools have to work together with each other. Lots of times, applications did have all kind of features, but did fail at the basics, failed with JACK or where lacking Session Management support. Workflow destroyed by a failing application of by not fitting in the chain.

For me Jonathan the author of Non-Daw (https://non.tuxfamily.org/) has shown how it could be and I'm glad to see Non-Session-Manager (NSM) is now seen as 'the' session management tool for Linuxaudio by the developer(s) of JACK. Good choice! I would really encourage people to work with it and to support it in your applications.

So I thought, let's check those tools again and really learn how they work, I'm sure those tools will proof to be useful for me, even when messing around with SuperCollider. Some things are just a bit different in the GUI then other DAWs and as a user, you're too often just clicking stuff in the GUI, without exactly knowing how it is designed. So I did read the non-session-manager, non-sequencer, non-timeline and non-mixer manual last week. And still in love. ;). Non-Sequencer runs much better then I expected and the way you can automate things via (OSC and CV) non-timeline with non-mixer is just great. Lot's of potential also in combination with other Linuxaudio tools! Non-Session-Manager works so fast and good, that even a rare crash of Non-Sequencer was not a real problem, because within 3 seconds it runs again with the same JACK connections and session. In Kxstudio Non-mixer has also LV2 support now, for those who needs it (o my Filipe Coelho is still working his butt off!) .

For non-sequencer I had to learn that 'c' creates a new pattern and that when I accidentally exceeded the 2x4 bars length of a pattern, I had to set a range and then hit 'shift + c' to crop to range. Those shortcut keys are essential to know. Also setting a loop in non-timeline for instance, was hard to find, but easy if you know how to do it.

In my opinion, Carla proves to be really useful in a setup with NSM and the Non-tools. It's great that you can hide the GUIs, so working with all those small applications is doable, especially if you work with templates in NSM. NSM has that 'hide GUI' option too. Great to see that Carla is also supporting OSC and CV. Now I feel things can get really interesting and it could make Linuxaudio such a powerful modular environment!

Also launched a demo version of Bitwig. It's nice to know you've that option, all though it doesn't attract me much. It's not that such a application is that simple. They really help you to get started, but there are tons of options which makes that you really have to spent time to learn to work with it. It might not be hard to get something really slick sounding tune out of it, but then, how unique is that song and what is the sound-quality of it? I could be wrong. I'd rather work with FLOSS software though to be honest, I like the philosophy and technique behind it.

I also tried Radium tracker in my rediscovery process and that looks like a very interesting application too. It's more music composing software, then a traditional DAW like Ardour and in that realm Linuxaudio can be a challenge. Application has difficulties with some video drivers though and I'm not really fan of it's distribution system.

So my plan is actually to learn to work with SuperCollider. Let's see how far I get, but the nice thing is already that it gives you much insight in sound and sound-synthesis, which also helps you to understand the Linuxaudio tools and synths better. I find these tutorials really helpful to get started
:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... XSGq4iEWYC

And this is a good read too:
https://www.soundonsound.com/series/synth-secrets

Enjoy!
Non-Session-Manager | FYI: Arch Linux / KXstudio do offer graphically less optimized packages (without NTK toolkit) of the original NSM GUI since June 2020. Original NSM GUI with NTK toolkit here

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raboof
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Re: Back... in the days

Post by raboof »

Welcome back! :)

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khz
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Re: Back... in the days

Post by khz »

Good to have you back. 8)
FZ - Does humor belongs in Music?
GNU/LINUX@AUDIO ~ /Wiki $ Howto.Info && GNU/Linux Debian installing >> Linux Audio Workstation LAW
  • I don't care about the freedom of speech because I have nothing to say.

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studio32
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Re: Back... in the days

Post by studio32 »

:D
Non-Session-Manager | FYI: Arch Linux / KXstudio do offer graphically less optimized packages (without NTK toolkit) of the original NSM GUI since June 2020. Original NSM GUI with NTK toolkit here

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